Shoes Cup and Cork Club

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“Shoes Cup and Cork Club” is a local coffee house and bar located across from the courthouse in old town Leesburg Virginia. The eccentric little shop has a rustic historical feel to it. It would almost appear to be your regular hipster coffee shop except for the fact that there is a small narrow pathway wedged between two buildings that leads you the “the secret garden” behind the shop. In the garden there is normally a musician playing and staff waiting on tables. The shop was originally an old shoe store that would repair old shoes. When the shoe store went out of business it became a cup and cork keeping the original shoe store sign and using some of the original shoes left behind for decoration. The shop has now switched hands a few times and the current owner wrote the fallowing article (link below).

The Purpose of the article in was to tell the reader about the re-opening of the local coffee shop “Shoes Cup and Cork” and hopefully generate business. The writer uses her ethos by portraying herself as a mother and proud owner of the coffee shop. You assume she is both caring and successful. A good portion of the writing is appealing to Pathos. She talks about her attachment to the shop and its rich history. By telling the reader how she would laugh and cry with her best friends in the shop over chai lattes, you start to sympathize with her. Most people share similar memories with friends. She uses casual language to make the reader feel as though you are in conversation with her and she is explaining to you her story.

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The textual analyzer above highlights the frequency of words used in her writing. Besides words like “and” and “it” you notice her main word choices include shoes, soul, and you. I decided to highlight the fact that “you” is so prevalent in the piece. The author really wanted the reader feel as though the story applies to them; as if it matters to the reader as much as it does the author. The author wants you to feel as though you are apart of the story so you want to them contribute to the business.
Another one of her main words is shoes. This is appropriate because as she is trying to promote her business you need to know what you are promoting. The frequent repletion of the name shoes is meant to make sure you remember what it all about.  Using another textual analyzer, you notice that she uses the words shoes more frequently in the middle and at the end. This was done on purpose so that you leave with the name of shoes in your head at the end of the article.

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The author uses Logos to explain why Shoes cup and cork is different than Wegman’s and Starbucks. Even though they both have free parking and shoes doesn’t and Wegman’s has similar food to shoes she argues that Shoes cup and cork has one thing that Wegman’s and Starbucks doesn’t have which is Soul. The word Soul was also used quite frequently throughout the writing. The word “soul” induces a certain response. The author uses the word soul in a cute-sie way to refer to both the bottom of a shoe (sole) and the soul inside of you. The word Soul gives the shop an eccentric holistic feel to it. Everyone likes a place with a good soul. Noticeably used toward the end of the writing to explain the new direction of the shop “re-souled.”

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The writing made me feel like I was taking part in a conversation. It was both relaxed, cute, and entertaining. The author did a good job explaining why Shoes Cup and Cork is special and why it is being reopened. The target audience is locals in the area. She wants to let you know that Shoes Cup and Cork is apart of the community and is apart of what makes old town Leesburg, Virginia unique.

Article:

http://shoescupandcork.com/about-us/

Genius: http://genius.com/Unknown-the-story-behind-shoes-cup-and-cork-annotated/

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